Circuit Components


7 posts
by ibanezmatt13 » Mon Dec 31, 2012 10:49 am
Hi,

Recently I have been using the Raspberry Pi's GPIO quite a lot; I even managed to fry the 13th GPIO pin!

Basically, I have had a couple of close encounters with the frying of my Raspberry Pi, and until I decide on which interface board to get for my breadboard, I must find alternative ways of protecting my circuits.

I have a starter kit for the Pi which includes over 150 different components; some include: capacitors, diodes, motors, relays, transistors, potentiometers etc...

The issue is, despite me understanding how each of the aforementioned componentes work, I do not understand how I should fit them into my breadboard; where on my breadboard is probably a more direct question.

For example, I wish to use capacitors, but I don't know how I should install them into my breadboard. If anybody can provide a circuit for me to construct on my breadboard which will teach me how to install the various aforementioned components I will be extremely grateful. Perhaps somebody may also be able to reccommend some software which allows me to create schematic for the breadboard. I have seen examples on various websites.

Many thanks in advance,
Matthew
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by PhillyNJ » Mon Dec 31, 2012 11:19 am
Hi,

I've been a programmer for around 10 years and just recently got into electronics. I would highly recommend this book: "Make: Electronics (Learning by Discovery)"
http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&keywords=make%20makezine&page=1&rh=n%3A172282%2Ck%3Amake%20makezine
It teaches you the foundation to working with electronics by example. I bought this book before I bought my Pi and its been a great resource.
In addition Adafruit has an awesome set of tutorials (http://learn.adafruit.com/category/raspberry-pi)
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by ibanezmatt13 » Mon Dec 31, 2012 11:50 am
PhillyNJ wrote:Hi,

I've been a programmer for around 10 years and just recently got into electronics. I would highly recommend this book: "Make: Electronics (Learning by Discovery)"
http://www.amazon.com/s?ie=UTF8&keywords=make%20makezine&page=1&rh=n%3A172282%2Ck%3Amake%20makezine
It teaches you the foundation to working with electronics by example. I bought this book before I bought my Pi and its been a great resource.
In addition Adafruit has an awesome set of tutorials (http://learn.adafruit.com/category/raspberry-pi)


Hi,

Many thanks for your reply.

I have already been through many Adafruit tutorials, but the issue is, I cannot seem to find any tutorials which incorporate the use of components such as capacitors, transmitters, receivers, integrated circuits etc...

Also, that book that you provided the link for does look very interesting indeed. I will certainly consider buying it in the next few hours should no alternative methods spring to mind.

Thank you for your reply.

Matthew
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by malakai » Mon Dec 31, 2012 12:00 pm
I picked up that book I am liking it.

I think the answer to capacitor is they have a pos and neg leg so you would want them oriented in that direction. Another suggestion would be to install fritzing onto a PC and diagram your stuff on it. Adafruit even has a Pi plugin for it.
http://www.raspians.com - always looking for content feel free to ask to have it posted. Or sign up and message me to become a contributor to the site. Raspians is not affiliated with the Raspberry Pi Foundation. (RPi's + You = Raspians)
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by ibanezmatt13 » Mon Dec 31, 2012 12:05 pm
malakai wrote:I picked up that book I am liking it.

I think the answer to capacitor is they have a pos and neg leg so you would want them oriented in that direction. Another suggestion would be to install fritzing onto a PC and diagram your stuff on it. Adafruit even has a Pi plugin for it.


Hi Malakai,

Many thanks for your reply.

That software 'Fritzing' is just the type of software I was looking at, thank you.

Thank you also for the explanation regarding how capacitors work. I understand how they work, but I still cannot figure how I should connect it into a circuit. Nor do I understand which capacitor I should use depending on which circuit I construct. I would be greatly appreciative if you could specify a specific tutorial circuit which will help my understanding of capacitors.

Many thanks
Matthew
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by malakai » Mon Dec 31, 2012 12:24 pm
I think something like this may help not I am not very advanced on electronics but their explanation seems to make sense. http://www.learningaboutelectronics.com/Articles/What-does-the-voltage-rating-on-a-capacitor-mean

Remember that capacitors are storage devices. The main thing you need to know about capacitors is that they store X charge at X voltage; meaning, they hold a certain size charge (1µF, 100µF, 1000µF, etc.) at a certain voltage (10V, 25V, 50V, etc.). So when choosing a capacitor you just need to know what size charge you want and at which voltage.

That's a small bit of info the rest is beyond me. I think it comes down to a formula like this:
Time Constant T = C x R

T is in Seconds. (t) C is in MicroFarads. (μF) R is in MegaOhms (MΩ)

http://www.techitoutuk.com/knowledge/electronics/components/capacitors/capac.html

Google capacitor breadboard and there are some examples
http://www.raspians.com - always looking for content feel free to ask to have it posted. Or sign up and message me to become a contributor to the site. Raspians is not affiliated with the Raspberry Pi Foundation. (RPi's + You = Raspians)
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by Ravenous » Mon Dec 31, 2012 12:26 pm
What do you need a capacitor for?

I can think of several uses:

Audio circuits will often have a decoupling capacitor at the input and output (like DIY guitar fuzz circuits, I guess you've seen those with "Ibanez" in your name!) to block DC and let only the audio through. These will often be the electrolytics with a + and - leg like Malakai said.

Big electrolytics can be used across power connections to smooth out dips in the power

Small ceramic capacitors will also be used across the power, but physically very close to an IC, to suppress tiny spikes the ICs cause when switching etc (used quite a lot in digital circuits like the raspi itself, and lots of audio ones) These ones usually don't care which way they're connected (they're just a pair of plates with a layer of "stuff" between them.)

And capacitors of various types and sizes are used as timing elements in oscillators, filters, all sorts of things...

So the question really is, what sort of circuit do you want to build first?

There's some links to start with here by the way:
http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/components/capac.htm
http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/capacit.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor
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