Which one should I start with?


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by Bob The Fat Unicorn » Sun Dec 30, 2012 4:52 am
If someone could tell me which one i should start with that would really help. :D
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by texy » Sun Dec 30, 2012 8:08 am
Unicorns aren't very good at explaining themselves are they, lol.
T.
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http://www.raspberrypi.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=93&t=65566
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by SiriusHardware » Sun Dec 30, 2012 12:04 pm
Bob - really not enough information. :)

Taking your question in one possible context, and bearing in mind where you have posted it, I'm going to assume you were asking whether you should use Python 2 or Python 3?

There isn't really a solid answer. Python 2 has been around for longer and so there are more resources and existing python programs and documentation for version 2. On the other hand, Python 3 is 'the way forward' and a lot of the books and Python teaching resources coming out now assume that you are using Python 3.

I personally have ended up using Python 2 more than Python 3, but as you can tell from the fact that both Python 2 and Python 3 are provided with your Pi, there really is no right answer.
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by Jim JKla » Sun Dec 30, 2012 1:09 pm
Given the information we can only answer the nearest one. ;)
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by Bob The Fat Unicorn » Sun Dec 30, 2012 2:48 pm
Thanks guys but which one is the easiest because I am a beginner.
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by croston » Sun Dec 30, 2012 2:51 pm
Python 2 and 3 are almost the same. I would use whichever is used by the tutorial you decide to start off with.
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by Jim JKla » Sun Dec 30, 2012 7:03 pm
The differences are subtle as we say just make sure you are using the correct tutorial.

The differences are enough to stop your code working but so hard to find if you areon the wrong version.
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by SiriusHardware » Tue Jan 01, 2013 8:55 pm
Bob The Fat Unicorn wrote:Thanks guys but which one is the easiest because I am a beginner.


Hi Again Bob,

Here is just one example of a Python programming course available online: There are others.

http://learnpythonthehardway.org/

Don't be put off by the 'hard way' part of the name - it's a good course.

The first lesson describes how to download and install Python version 2, but you can skip that step if you have a Pi, and just start trying out subsequent lessons using Python 2 which is one of the versions already installed on the Pi.
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by Jim JKla » Tue Jan 01, 2013 9:12 pm
Bob The Fat Unicorn wrote:Thanks guys but which one is the easiest because I am a beginner.


Niether the differences are so subtle it's like learning to spell in American and learning to spell in English you only notice the differences if you change between them or you are using the wrong reference. ;)
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