Raspberry Pi Roadmap?


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by williamhbell » Tue Dec 18, 2012 11:52 pm
Hi pygmy_giant,

Sounds like you are looking for,
http://www.raspberrypi.org/archives/1116
which is presumably aimed at the educational release.

Regards,

Will
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by pygmy_giant » Wed Dec 19, 2012 12:07 am
Good idea, but it has not progressed very far since April - why doesn't the project leader ask permission to plunder the MagPi - there are quite a few good tutorials in there. Maybe the MagPi team could consider eventually collating these into a book...?
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by williamhbell » Wed Dec 19, 2012 12:21 am
Hi pygmy_giant,

A fully indexed MagPi magazine does not really need to be plundered, since it can be easily installed via the Raspberry Pi App store. We (the MagPi) are working with CAS to reach more teachers. The MagPi is already listed in the CAS resource list and should be on the back page of January's SwitchedOn CAS newsletter.

Regards,

Will
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by pygmy_giant » Wed Dec 19, 2012 10:51 pm
Oh - sounds like youve got it covered then
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by jamesh » Thu Dec 20, 2012 8:21 am
The Foundation takes the educational side very seriously. You may not see progress, but stuff is being done behind the scenes, Changing an educational mindset takes time. There is no instant fix.

Meanwhile, the Raspi is selling like hots cakes to millions, and the Foundation makes money on every sale that goes towards the educational side of things. And even is a small proportion of those sell for education, its still a lot of people learning. Even better, its getting in to the hands of really smart people who are write really smart SW, and helping out with any teething problems. So by the time the educationalists really grasp the mettle, it's a robust platform with the bugs ironed out and lots of great software.
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by pygmy_giant » Thu Dec 20, 2012 12:55 pm
Thats good - someone pointed out this book today: http://www.brucesmith.info/page10.html so interest is definately growing. Looks like there will be alot of 3rd party resources also.
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by pygmy_giant » Thu Dec 20, 2012 1:27 pm
Googling CASA seems to show that they have a large presence accross the US. I also had a glance at the Nesta website http://www.nesta.org.uk and did a search for 'Raspberry' and a number of articles did pop up which I should pay closer attention to. one says:

"The developers, the Raspberry Pi Foundation, are following a 'build it and they will come' model and this will need to be backed up by support from schools and perhaps even a new curriculum. But whether or not the device encourages children to become developers, the act of shoe-horning technical specs onto single chips to get the cost of computing down to a minimal consumer price revolutionises the idea that computers should always be increasing their capacity.

I wonder whether the development of the Raspberry Pi signals a growing trend of 'just enough' technology. What I mean by this is technology that does just enough to be programmable, without having to cram expensive add-ons into the package. This would have a huge impact on the ownership, use and development of ubiquitous computing for the 21st century."

I guess this is occuring and that maybe there needs to be a bit of a change in mindset amoung educational professionals about what an educational computer should look like and cost. Perhaps this requires practical examples from outside education of what is possible.
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by thradtke » Thu Dec 20, 2012 2:15 pm
pygmy_giant wrote:But whether or not the device encourages children to become developers, the act of shoe-horning technical specs onto single chips to get the cost of computing down to a minimal consumer price revolutionises the idea that computers should always be increasing their capacity.

They should! It's just that the average use case doesn't require this and people slowly recognizing it in the course of using relatively weak tablets and smartphones. The Pi maybe let this thought materialize on the desktop.

It is really interesting: In the past we had a Sun in the lab and a C64 at home. Maybe in 10 or 20 years we're back there, this time not because top computers were too expensive, but just because their power requirements cannot be justified any more.

In education, at least in the western world, the Pi IMO remains a toy for technologically interested kids, and a nice one.
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by pygmy_giant » Thu Dec 20, 2012 2:24 pm
It's BIgger, faster, better vs smaller & cheaper.

My sister told me today that she is excited about upgrading Samsung S3 with free bundled tablet. I told her I'm still made up that I am still using the basic Pay as you go (Samsung) phone that I bought for £5 over a year ago.

Why buy tomorrows tech at todays prices when you can have 10 year old tech at 1950s prices - that's my motto.

Kids brains aren't evolving so I'm in the 'just enough tech' camp
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by Lionbean » Sun Jan 13, 2013 11:44 am
liz wrote:We're *hoping* to have a final, no-more-tweaks-necessary Model B finished by the end of 2012.

So, any updates regarding the status? I really hope, that there is some improvement regarding analog audio signal, - i am curious :)
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by thradtke » Mon Jan 14, 2013 6:33 am
You won't know before they're in the wild - see Osborne Effect.
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