Android Custom ROMs


8 posts
by Kernel » Mon Mar 12, 2012 10:00 am
Anyone here install custom ROMs on their android phone?

Recently installed Swedish Snow (Android 2.3.7) on my ZTE Blade via the TPT method - and it is as if I have a totally new phone - especially liking the app2SD feature (previous stock rom was 2.1 which doesn't support this feature)
Posts: 395
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2012 12:53 pm
by xpsychox » Fri Apr 06, 2012 3:22 am
Yes, actually I've installed quite a few custom ROM's on my android.. Currently, I'm running the Droid Bionic (in USA) WAS 5.5.902 Stock, was a b*tch to find a root to bypass that.. Moto did update on purpose to break most of all roots.. but I'm now running Th3ory's Kin3tx rom.. and I LOVE it.. installed hon3y scr3am (also affiliated with Th3ory) UI over that to make it look a bit better.. Lemme no if u want screen shots..
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2012 2:12 am
by fodi » Fri Apr 06, 2012 10:59 am
yes, now i'm stuck with miui on my galaxy s for a few months now and i'm very satisfied with it

it would be great to have android on the pi itself, as well, i hope it would happen sooner or later. cm7 or miui would be the best, maybe cm7 has more chance to happen
User avatar
Posts: 112
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2012 9:03 pm
Location: Hungary
by tech_monkey » Fri Apr 06, 2012 6:46 pm
I am on my second custom rom for my Flytouch 3 tablet.
http://www.casatech.eu
Posts: 130
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 6:12 pm
by reiuyi » Sun Apr 08, 2012 4:15 pm
Personally I must ask; are factory-provided roms really that bad?

I don't own any android devices and only know of one person who has one. They replaced the rom because Sony's android phones apparently don't allow the standard android app store.. Are rom-makers that stupid or am I missing something essential?

It doesn't feel intuitive to lock users out of functionality that makes a device so popular. I remember at the very beginning of iOS, you couldn't install native applications (only web applications; which were just icons linking to a site); so users hacked the first iPhones in such a way that they created the first app store. That's right, the foundations for the Apple app store were made BY users, not FOR users. The success of fan-made stores probably contributed to the creation of the official one. With Android devices, there's multiple application stores, yet there seems to be no consensus that Google's store is actually a centralized point which each device should have access to. What's up with that?
User avatar
Posts: 165
Joined: Sun Oct 09, 2011 4:59 pm
by Tass » Sun Apr 08, 2012 7:39 pm
I've also tried out MIUI on my Galaxy S and was very happy with it.

@DeliciousRaspberryCake The factory ROMs aren't that bad, which is why I went back to Gingerbread after a few months of MIUI.  It was good, but not quite as good as the Samsung ROM.

Interestingly, on phones like the Galaxy SII, Samsung support custom ROMs (maybe not "support", but at least officially condone it).  It makes sense - they provide something that they think is the best option, but are happy for users to try other options.  HTC for instance, do not - the Sensation is locked down to their bootloader.
User avatar
Posts: 535
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 11:15 am
by Nr90 » Sun Apr 08, 2012 7:39 pm
I am running a fairly stock ICS rom on my htc desire.
Reasons I run a custom rom:
- htc will not port ICS to my phone
- I can overclock / underclock my CPU
- less bloatware
- custom rom allows me to use the EXT4 partition on my sd card as /data because the desire has very little internal storage.
- changing your ROM makes an almost two years old phone feel new.
Posts: 213
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2011 12:39 pm
by Kernel » Sun Apr 08, 2012 8:01 pm
DeliciousRaspberryCake said:


Personally I must ask; are factory-provided roms really that bad?

I don't own any android devices and only know of one person who has one. They replaced the rom because Sony's android phones apparently don't allow the standard android app store.. Are rom-makers that stupid or am I missing something essential?

It doesn't feel intuitive to lock users out of functionality that makes a device so popular. I remember at the very beginning of iOS, you couldn't install native applications (only web applications; which were just icons linking to a site); so users hacked the first iPhones in such a way that they created the first app store. That's right, the foundations for the Apple app store were made BY users, not FOR users. The success of fan-made stores probably contributed to the creation of the official one. With Android devices, there's multiple application stores, yet there seems to be no consensus that Google's store is actually a centralized point which each device should have access to. What's up with that?


The problem is mainly that unlike Apple very few Android manufacturers (or the networks) will push out official updates (one exception is Samsung who seem to be quite good at this) because:

- if something goes wrong with the upgrade they get the blame

- more work is required as there are so many different types of android phones and hardware

- the networks hope that by not upgrading you you'll spend money again and buy a phone with a newer Android version

i.e. my phone came with Android 2.0 and Orange will not provide an official update – so in order to get features of later Android versions (like ability to move apps to the SD card) I needed to flash it myself.

The vast majority of devices do have access to the Google app store(/market/play) – most of the other app stores aren't very popular. However at the end of the day it usually comes down to money and control. For example Amazon have released the Kindle Fire – they stripped Android right down (as they can because it is open source) removed the google apps and put their own market onto it (so they get any royalties I suppose).

The fact that Android is open source also means it is possible to do many things with custom roms that the manufacturer might not want you to do – i.e. overclock the cpu etc. (though there are also apps that do this I think)

Also the factory installed roms often come up with bloatware (just like windows pc's..) which can be difficult to remove sometimes.

So it is a trade-off in some ways – with Apple you get guaranteed OS updates (but the source is closed) and with Android you have more freedom and choice (both in terms of the software but also the hardware as so many phones are available at many different price points).

I have been using my custom rom for about a month and have been very happy with it :D

edit: and as Nr90 says it makes your old phone feel brand new!
Posts: 395
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2012 12:53 pm