ADD IR RECEIVER to USE RBP AS VIDEO PLAYER


15 posts
by farooqhasny » Thu Dec 29, 2011 7:08 am
R.B.P  has a great hardware for video play back and also a powered USB so it can be use as a video player if only it has a irda receiver .

http://www.lirc.org/receivers.html

irda receiver are very cheep and since 5V power is already available on board so only 1 part will be added . And i am sure it will not increase the cost but will add a great feature to the design.

since all the software work is already done by LIRC. (great work) .....Almost any Remote control can be map to control video player ....
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2011 6:28 am
by Ogoshi » Thu Dec 29, 2011 7:25 am
I know it"s probably defeating the object but could you use a bluetooth remote and receiver?
Posts: 44
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2011 5:13 pm
Location: Southend-on-Sea, Essex, England
by roguethunder » Thu Dec 29, 2011 11:55 am
I cant imagine such would be hard to add through the GPIO pins. Just a thought. As such no real need to include it stock. Im sure someone will throw one on it at some point ^.^
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2011 8:53 pm
by jamesh » Thu Dec 29, 2011 12:07 pm
farooqhasny said:


R.B.P  has a great hardware for video play back and also a powered USB so it can be use as a video player if only it has a irda receiver .

http://www.lirc.org/receivers.html

irda receiver are very cheep and since 5V power is already available on board so only 1 part will be added . And i am sure it will not increase the cost but will add a great feature to the design.

since all the software work is already done by LIRC. (great work) .....Almost any Remote control can be map to control video player ....


Adding anything is not a zero cost exercise, even if what you add is very cheap. You have a board redesign, plus software to write to make it all work. All for very little benefit in this case as the market for it is small.
Soon to be unemployed software engineer currently specialising in camera drivers and frameworks, but can put mind to most embedded tasks. Got a job in N.Cambridge or surroundings? I'm interested!
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Posts: 11582
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 7:41 pm
by mobeyduck » Thu Dec 29, 2011 12:38 pm
The question is can the soc support IR if not the only option is to use the usb.

Because the GPIO are meant for personal use and experiments it wont be possible to use those if it would be build in.

And it will increase the cost of the whole computer not mentioning missing the initial goal of getting people to program.

And I'm almost forgetting the positioning of the IR receiver if its on the board you need to put the board and all its cables in plain sight even tough the R-Pi is pritty it will look messy so you would need some sort of cabled receiver and then you end up with people not having long enough cables. and then you would need a specific remote that can use it.

long story short, it wont be practical and a usb bluetooth dongle is cheaper and more versitile 2 seconds of googling led me to a €3,99 mini dongle no compatibility with windows 7 tough but who needs that? ;) you could even use your mobile phone to control it
Posts: 173
Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2011 6:39 pm
by Gert van Loo » Thu Dec 29, 2011 1:14 pm
For those of you who are not familiar with IR: The electrical protocol is close to that of a UART (start, data, stop) but with the major difference that the signal is RZ (Return to Zero) and has a narrow pulse width. To forestall the question: No, there is no way to use a standard UART to receive the signal.

So you have to do the receiver in software, keeping exact track of timing of the edges. For this you want an accurate timer to read and after each edge you want to change the interrupt polarity of your GPIO input. For high baud rates you also want fast response to the interrupt otherwise the edge time your are reading is off by too much. Baseline: do-able but requiring a lot of attention to detail when you write the software.
User avatar
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Posts: 1988
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 7:27 am
by Warringer » Thu Dec 29, 2011 8:09 pm
How about the boxee remote?

http://blog.boxee.tv/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Boxee-Box-remote-1024x662.jpg

I plan to use that one on my Media Center Pi.

Anyway, it should be relatively easy to use a cheap microcontroller (ATTiny 13), hook it up to a IR receiver and then transmit the data through the serial RS232 port. You can run everything off the 3.3V line of the Pi...
Posts: 56
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2011 5:04 pm
by Tomo2k » Thu Dec 29, 2011 8:46 pm
Or even easier, get an existing USB IR receiver. As a bonus, they even come with a remote!

There are plenty of these around, and they just plug into a USB socket of the machine.

(Edit) – Doing a quick Google, I found quite a lot of homebuilt projects you could make if you want to, as well as commercial modules you could buy.
Posts: 126
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2011 10:00 pm
by farooqhasny » Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:34 pm
Gert said:


For those of you who are not familiar with IR: The electrical protocol is close to that of a UART (start, data, stop) but with the major difference that the signal is RZ (Return to Zero) and has a narrow pulse width. To forestall the question: No, there is no way to use a standard UART to receive the signal.

So you have to do the receiver in software, keeping exact track of timing of the edges. For this you want an accurate timer to read and after each edge you want to change the interrupt polarity of your GPIO input. For high baud rates you also want fast response to the interrupt otherwise the edge time your are reading is off by too much. Baseline: do-able but requiring a lot of attention to detail when you write the software.


Fist of all thanks for correcting me that ir Receiver cant be connected on Rx input of serial port .i did some reading after this replay ... and found out that LIRC project includes a GPIO interrupt driven input driver lirc_gpio(http://www.lirc.org/html/install.html) . since we have some GPIOs available with interrupts . A IR reciever like TSOP 1738  (http://www.lirc.org/receivers.html) can directly be connected without any other components . i am insisting on this method over USB cause it will be the cheapest and smallest. and a version of RBP can be introduce with out any change to basic design as a video player and can be sell at a higher price to produce more revenue to support the actual cause
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2011 6:28 am
by iljaas » Sat Jan 28, 2012 9:48 pm
Suggestion: use your smartphone as a remote over the network
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2012 10:57 am
by stormy1 » Sat Jan 28, 2012 11:11 pm
These should work fine.

Just connect it to the usb port and it will see it as a mouse and keyboard.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/produ.....01_details
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 3:44 am
by stormy1 » Sat Jan 28, 2012 11:14 pm
Also hdmi cec is being worked on and if it works you wont even need that :}
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 3:44 am
by welshblob » Sat Jan 28, 2012 11:14 pm
Tomo2k said:


Or even easier, get an existing USB IR receiver. As a bonus, they even come with a remote!


^^ this, and the benefit is that your can get USB IR receivers on a wire so you can hide the rpi right behind the tv.

Bakove said:


Suggestion: use your smartphone as a remote over the network


^^ not this, imho, smartphone remotes are fiddly as if you want to pause something then you need to press a button to to turn the screen on then unlock the screen. At least thats what its like on my android phone with the xbmc remote. Much more straight forward with a normal ir remote
Posts: 131
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 9:31 am
by naicheben » Tue Feb 28, 2012 9:53 pm
@farooqhasny

did you manage to compile lirc for the GPIO on the Raspberry Pi? I wonder what to change in the sources to meet the GPIO-addresses of the R.Pi and if thats all???
Posts: 346
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 12:28 pm
by ProDigit » Sun Mar 04, 2012 5:53 pm
I think the R-pi would see more use as a media player than anything else in my home,

and,

there'll be plenty of people using it as an all-round decoder for video's and computing!

I am also a proponent of bluetooth,

1- because bluetooth allows you to hide the device, as sender and receiver don't need to be in line of sight

2- Because bluetooth allows you to do so much more than using it as a remote control! I know if it has wifi, it already has a network connection, but finding a remote that works on wifi is still pretty scarce!

3- You could literally run your computer from a cellphone, text typing etc… You could also connect a bluetooth mouse and keyboard to the device, without needing to connect to a USB port; a single bluetooth LED could receive both mouse and keyboard, and would be good enough for standard computer use (but perhaps too laggy for gaming).

4- So far bluetooth has a higher bandwidth than IR, but also a higher power consumption (not that the latter matters very much, only if the device is equipped with, and running from a battery).

Having a bluetooth connection could not only connect keyboard and mouse at the same time, but also remote controls of all sorts (including joysticks or gamepads); which would allow you to play games, give presentations, browse photo's click on webpages, and type letters all in one connection,while leaving the other 2 USB ports for external HD and/or flash drive/SD card reader, printer/scanner, machine output (like a Mendel), or pen input (if that driver ever gets invented).
Posts: 85
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2011 1:24 am