The start of raspbian (Debian Hard Float (armhf) for RPi)


 
614 posts   Page 6 of 25   1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ... 25
by mpthompson » Sun Apr 15, 2012 3:40 am
I was out much of the day with my family, but it's nice to be able to go out and have compilations occur automatically.  The scripts give me an email notification each time a package is built.  I'm continuing to find bugs in the scripts, but they are becoming less frequent.  My old perl skills are slowly coming back to me.

I still have to write a few helper scripts to fully automate the build process and verify the binaries as being ARMv7 clean before they are inserted into the repository.  I'm doing that manually for now, but it's not too bad.  On the package building side, I'm letting the iMX53 QSB plug away on the second tier packages that allow something more than a bare "minimal" installation of Debian, something closer to a "standard" installation that includes programs users commonly expect to find on any Linux system.

Of about 40 packages built this morning only two failed -- one for failing a test and another found to have ARMv7 code in it.  I have another 40 or so packages on tap for this evening and we'll see if the ratio to good to not-good packages stays about the same.
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 620
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:18 pm
Location: San Carlos, CA
by abishur » Sun Apr 15, 2012 4:48 am
That is amazing!  On the repository issue, would it be possible to instead focus on a program that would download the dpkg from an already existing repository and run the scripts to configure it for the armhf?  Or is it too late by the time it downloads?  Even if it was just a text line program like apt-get, that would free you from any financial burden.

Obviously, this is way outside my knowledge base and something I look forward to learning with my own pis, but it would be nice if such a solution were possible :-)
Dear forum: Play nice ;-)
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 4263
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2011 4:10 am
Location: USA
by mpthompson » Sun Apr 15, 2012 4:55 am
Abishur said:


On the repository issue, would it be possible to instead focus on a program that would download the dpkg from an already existing repository and run the scripts to configure it for the armhf?  Or is it too late by the time it downloads?  Even if it was just a text line program like apt-get, that would free you from any financial burden.


Abishur, probably best to to choose a Linux distribution that is more geared towards that type of on the fly building such as Gentoo.  Debian, at its heart, is geared towards centralized collections of pre-compiled packages that simply work once downloaded.  Of course, the matter of creating those centralized collections of software goodness is a completely different matter.
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 620
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:18 pm
Location: San Carlos, CA
by abishur » Sun Apr 15, 2012 5:01 am
Ah, I figured such was the case, it just would have been nice to not have to have you worrying about a repository host ;-)
Dear forum: Play nice ;-)
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 4263
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2011 4:10 am
Location: USA
by mpthompson » Mon Apr 16, 2012 3:11 pm
Spent my limited time on Sunday learning how to modify Debian source packages, updating their version number and inserting them back into my local repository.  I needed to learn to do this so that I could go back and make sure that the few packages I had to modify were properly inserted into the repository with the source code changes.  I'm now doing one more 12-hour build of gcc so that the source code, version number and binaries all properly match each other in the repository.

Up for today is selecting a hosting provider for the public repository, creating scripts to automate the checking of packages for v7 contamination between when sbuild finishes and dupload occurs, ordering the additional four iMX53 QSB build systems, disk drives and associated hardware.

Aside from the hosting and build hardware issues my major task is opening the flood gates into my private repository and filling it with 50GB of Debian sources and another 50GB of 'all' binaries.  If I don't have the package build system and processes automated and debugged, my fear is that problems will be encountered faster than I can cope with them.  Also, if things go awry I could accidentally mess up my repository and mess up much of the work that I've accomplished over the last few weeks.  I'll have a full backup of the smaller repository, but things will get more serious as it grows from just a few 100's of megabytes in size to a monster 10's of gigabytes in size.
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 620
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:18 pm
Location: San Carlos, CA
by mpthompson » Tue Apr 17, 2012 1:45 am
Today's update.  I purchased four additional iMX53 QSB, SATA hard drives and additional drives for a RAID configuration on a server configuration that will hold a local copy of the repository.  "In for a penny, in for a pound" I believe is the old saying.  The hardware should get here in about two days.  After the hardware is configured I'll then have five 1 GHz, 1 GB ARM devices churning out the packages and a dedicated server to hold the repository and the wanna-build database that controls which build machine builds what package.

In addition, I found a hosting provider that meets my budget target of $30 a month for hosting with unlimited storage space and unlimited transfer.  This may be the old story of you get what you pay for, but we'll see.  I'm configuring the server now with a the web server software and the repository.  I'm also dumping 100GB of Debian source code and platform independent binaries into it so we'll see what their "unlimited" plan really entails.  The hosting company is DreamHost.com.  They seem like a friendly group on their web site and they claim to be very friendly towards open source so hopefully they'll forgive me of pulling a LOT of data across their network and onto their servers while I'm getting things setup.

I just may be able to make my deadline of having a public Debian armhf repository up by the end of the week.  Keeping my fingers crossed.

The only thing I didn't get to today was working on further automating the build process.  Hopefully tomorrow.
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 620
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:18 pm
Location: San Carlos, CA
by boley » Tue Apr 17, 2012 3:16 am
Wow!  I don't know what else to say, except I'm rooting for you.
Posts: 48
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2011 9:50 pm
by mpthompson » Tue Apr 17, 2012 6:13 pm
Hmmm.  I knew it was too good to be true.  I was contacted by the sales department of the hosting provider saying their "VPS unlimited policy specifically prohibits
sites whose 'primary purpose is to consume disk space or bandwidth.'  This would include hosting or mirroring a debian port, or any other large file collection.  This would be permissible on their dedicated servers which start at $99 a month." I'm writing back to see to see if they'll give this project a break in price since they claim to be prolific Debian users.

Well, being unable to use the VPS is a setback.  It seems the going rate a for a dedicated server with 500+ GB of data and unlimited bandwidth looks to be about $90 to $100 a month.  Either with this hosting provider or another, I'll move forward and pay for the initial few months myself.  My hope is that once the Debian armhf for Raspberry Pi is complete that donations will pay for hosting costs and that other mirror sites will keep the costs from escalating.

Assuming I can get the packages built as I intend, do others believe that there is enough interest in Debian hard float for the Raspberry Pi that this project can be self sustaining through donations?
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 620
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:18 pm
Location: San Carlos, CA
by drewbharris » Tue Apr 17, 2012 6:20 pm
mpthompson said:


Hmmm.  I knew it was too good to be true.  I was contacted by the sales department of the hosting provider saying their "VPS unlimited policy specifically prohibits
sites whose 'primary purpose is to consume disk space or bandwidth.'  This would include hosting or mirroring a debian port, or any other large file collection.  This would be permissible on their dedicated servers which start at $99 a month." I'm writing back to see to see if they'll give this project a break in price since they claim to be prolific Debian users.

Well, being unable to use the VPS is a setback.  It seems the going rate a for a dedicated server with 500+ GB of data and unlimited bandwidth looks to be about $90 to $100 a month.  Either with this hosting provider or another, I'll move forward and pay for the initial few months myself.  My hope is that once the Debian armhf for Raspberry Pi is complete that donations will pay for hosting costs and that other mirror sites will keep the costs from escalating.

Assuming I can get the packages built as I intend, do others believe that there is enough interest in Debian hard float for the Raspberry Pi that this project can be self sustaining through donations?


Dreamhost is known to be a pretty unreliable host anyways.  A friend ran a rather large website that had up to 1 or 2 day outages at least once a month, if not more.  They calling themselves "bleeding-edge"... yeah, ok.

Someone earlier asked if you were able to run benchmarks on a real Pi to make sure this is still worth it.  Were you able to do that?  Was there a significant performance advantage?
Posts: 20
Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2012 8:16 pm
by mpthompson » Tue Apr 17, 2012 6:30 pm
drewbharris said:

Dreamhost is known to be a pretty unreliable host anyways.  A friend ran a rather large website that had up to 1 or 2 day outages at least once a month, if not more.  They calling themselves "bleeding-edge"... yeah, ok.

Yeah, I'm aware of the issues.  I'm operating on a shoe string budget for right now so any provider I deal with will very likely have similar issues.  There seems to be interest in other mirrors so that would hopefully compensate for downtime due to DDOS attacks that DreamHost customers seem to attract.  It's just that to get the mirrors going I need to get the main site up and I can't do that from my home internet connection.  Oh well, I'll get it figured out.


Someone earlier asked if you were able to run benchmarks on a real Pi to make sure this is still worth it.  Were you able to do that?  Was there a significant performance advantage?


Yes, Dom did run some benchmarks on real hardware and there were significant improvements in floating point operations as well more modest improvements in integer operations (ARMv6 opcodes???).  Something interesting is the floating point operations were faster than on my Freescale iMX53 at 1GHz.  The link to the results is somewhere back in this thread. I'll try to repost the link again later.
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 620
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:18 pm
Location: San Carlos, CA
by veryevil » Tue Apr 17, 2012 8:56 pm
Hey, so impressed with the work your doing.

As for the Server hosting issue Leaseweb has the following:

http://www.leaseweb.com/en/ded.....rator/2560

HP DL120G5

Intel E2160

2GB DDR2

2x250GB SATA2

1 x 100Mbps Full-Duplex

5000 GB (Standard network) (5 TB/ month)

Debian 6.0

For 40 Euros / month which is $52.48

They also offer discounts for contracts over month on month e.g. 32 Euros for 12 months which is $42.00

Is something like this not enough?
Posts: 24
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 3:38 pm
by plugwash » Tue Apr 17, 2012 11:18 pm
The probelm with leaseweb's metered packages is that they all seem to be on leaswebs "standard" network and the overage prices on leaseweb's standard network are very high (E1/gig) so if we were to go for such a package and then get whacked with traffic we could be in deep shit financially. I wouldn't be prepared to take that risk.

At the moment is we just don't know how much traffic we will be getting and we won't know until we actually have a substantial portion of packages built and users start using the port.
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 2235
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2011 11:45 pm
by mpthompson » Wed Apr 18, 2012 12:46 am
Well, with DreamHost VPS (I'm using their 1 week of free service) I just completed a complete import of all sources (48918 files) and architecture 'all' packages (15688 files).  The total size is 55G which, if I didn't miss anything, is about half of what I thought it might be.   I'll double check the reprepro update to confirm this is correct.  The RPi binaries should add no more than another 20G to 30G of data once they are built.

I'm kicking myself for asking the sales reps about hosting the Debian archive before I confirmed the numbers and before I started playing around with the 1 week of free service.  I have a feeling I would have flown under the radar for quite a while as 80GB of data is probably just a blip on their systems and I don't think the bandwidth will be an issue for quite a while.  Particularly if DreamHost hosts a lot of adult sites that consume tons of disk space and bandwidth.  It's a case where I should have been asking forgiveness rather than permission.  Oh well, I've learned my lesson.

I'm a bit nervous about the potential bandwidth fees if transfer is metered.  However, I'm not sure if those fears are valid.  An off the cuff calculations show that if 10,000 people do a full install of Debian hard float with extras (I'll round that about 500M of data) that is roughly 5T of data.  Is that likely to occur in the span of a single month?  I don't know.  If RPi sells 100,000 units over the next 6 months, I don't really see 5T of transfer being consumed any one month.  However, if they sell 500,000 units, that could spell trouble.

I'll have to think about this some more.  I'll probably just pop for the $99 dedicated 500GB server with unlimited transfer for a few months and hopefully this project can cover with donations future bandwidth costs once it's up and running.  If Dreamhost does prove to be unreliable things can be switched around as needed in the future as they won't be holding the master repository, but rather the public mirror.

Besides, I'm still waiting to hear if they'll give me a break on pricing.
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 620
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:18 pm
Location: San Carlos, CA
by Chris.Rowland » Wed Apr 18, 2012 9:36 am
Could your bandwidth be reduced considerably by only providing a torrent?  I realise than not everyone can use this but there seems to be a number of generous people with bandwidth to spare who can provide mirrors.
Posts: 239
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2012 5:45 pm
by plugwash » Wed Apr 18, 2012 12:16 pm
Chris Rowland said:


Could your bandwidth be reduced considerably by only providing a torrent?  I realise than not everyone can use this but there seems to be a number of generous people with bandwidth to spare who can provide mirrors.



Torrents are great for distributing stuff like filesystem images where you are dealing with a handfull of large files (and i'm sure when the time comes to distribute pre-canned armhf for Pi images we will use torrents for that). They are not really suitable for something like a repositry where there are a load of files that are individually relatively small, where the files change frequently and where each user will be picking out a different combination (albiet with some overlap).
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 2235
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2011 11:45 pm
by drewbharris » Wed Apr 18, 2012 1:23 pm
plugwash said:


Chris Rowland said:


Could your bandwidth be reduced considerably by only providing a torrent?  I realise than not everyone can use this but there seems to be a number of generous people with bandwidth to spare who can provide mirrors.


Torrents are great for distributing stuff like filesystem images where you are dealing with a handfull of large files (and i'm sure when the time comes to distribute pre-canned armhf for Pi images we will use torrents for that). They are not really suitable for something like a repositry where there are a load of files that are individually relatively small, where the files change frequently and where each user will be picking out a different combination (albiet with some overlap).


I agree with you somewhat.  Why not go with a Debian netinstall-style flat image, provided by torrents or by other generous hosters (get RPi on board to ask for bandwidth donations) and have the repo running as well for extra/more up-to-date packages?  That'd be the best of both worlds, I would think... cut a "release" every few months once packages are stable.
Posts: 20
Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2012 8:16 pm
by mpthompson » Wed Apr 18, 2012 4:24 pm
Update on where things are at.

I should be getting the four additional Freescale iMX53 QSB systems and hard disks today or tomorrow from Digikey.  Amazon should be delivering the additional disk drives for the build cluster and local repository.  Since these are bare circuit boards and drives without cases, I'll need to configure them in some sort of rack -- probably something very similar to what Steve McIntyre did with his cluster for the original armhf port.  I see a trip to the hardware store in my future as well as a search for the small screws used on 2.5" hard drives.  Should take a day or so to put it all together.

Last night I made major progress on the additional scripts required to automate the build process.  There is very little documentation on how the autobuild process.  And what little is available often describes how Debian did things a few years ago and may no longer be relevant.  Also, I believe a lot information is tribal knowledge within Debian which is passed along through email chains.  Getting things setup to even limp along was a major challenge.

For those interested, it seems that the Debian autobuild system is created to specifically have humans in the build loop with emails generated on each state change of packages within the wanna-build database.  Even with just one build system I was getting a little overwhelmed with the flood of emails that it produced.  In addition, the build servers themselves want to generate emails as they queue up built packages to be uploaded to the repository.  It seems humans are meant to look over each email and approve the upload to the repository by PGP signing a response, or they can dispose of the built package in other ways.  I'm basically replacing that part of the process with new scripts that will verify the built package is clean of ARMv7 code, perform other automated basic checks of the packages the email system performed and then automatically queue up the package for upload.  I'll review the status of things through the reprepro databases rather than the endless flow of emails.  Of course, the Debian autobuilder scripts are optimized for the daily incremental changes to the repository and a full rebuild an unusual and infrequent event.

To do all this, I had to write some new Perl applications -- and my haven't exercised the Perl part of my brain in about 10 years.  Yep, Perl is every bit as painful as I remember, but I just had to pound through it.  I need to clean up some things this morning, but I think I'm very close to done.

On the hosting front, I'm just going to move forward purchasing a dedicated server package to host the repository.  It's the simplest way forward.  I'll worry about paying for it in another month or two once repository has an interesting amount of RPi optimized Debian packages.  I'm going to go with DreamHost and cross my fingers we end up on a 'good' segment within the network.  If their network proves to be to flaky to deal with I'll move to another hosting provider.  However, by that time we should have some mirror of the repository up that will help reduce the pain of such a transfer should it become necessary.

On a final note, yesterday I started the download of 60GB of source code and architecture independent binaries into my local repository.  This is the source code the build cluster will chew on and produce RPi optimized Debian packages.  The download is about two thirds of the way done and it's looking like it will be less painful than I thought.  Of course, it's not done yet.  I wonder if Comcast will have anything to say about a single download in a day that is larger than my normal monthly usage.
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 620
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:18 pm
Location: San Carlos, CA
by mpthompson » Wed Apr 18, 2012 4:42 pm
drewbharris said:

I agree with you somewhat.  Why not go with a Debian netinstall-style flat image, provided by torrents or by other generous hosters (get RPi on board to ask for bandwidth donations) and have the repo running as well for extra/more up-to-date packages?  That'd be the best of both worlds, I would think... cut a "release" every few months once packages are stable.

I'll make images available, but I think that this early in the process it's important to concentrate the effort on a repository that is dynamic and updated on a daily basis.  Then people with interests/knowledge of specific packages can monitor them as they roll out of the build cluster.  If they notice things wrong, we can fix the issue, queue up a new build and have a package updated in the repository for testing fairly quickly.  Once the public repository is available -- hopefully within a few days -- anyone willing to help can create and distribute static images as you describe and help get the ball rolling.  It's just not where my efforts will be directed until builds are happening in a smooth and orderly manner.  I have no idea how long that will take, but I have the feeling it won't be happening soon.

Much of the repository hosting issues were my reluctance to be on the hook for potential costs associated with bandwidth since it's an unknown.  Now that I have a few options that aren't terribly expensive that alleviates that concern for me.  For now, things are still small and we have time to discover if the hosting providers I've chosen are too painful to work with.  If so, I'll deal with that issue in the future.
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 620
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:18 pm
Location: San Carlos, CA
by repvik » Wed Apr 18, 2012 9:02 pm
mpthompson said:


Last night I made major progress on the additional scripts required to automate the build process.  There is very little documentation on how the autobuild process.  And what little is available often describes how Debian did things a few years ago and may no longer be relevant.  Also, I believe a lot information is tribal knowledge within Debian which is passed along through email chains.  Getting things setup to even limp along was a major challenge.


You might want to talk to the folks that set up the Debian autobuilder for the NSLU2-linux project. I believe Tom King (ka6sox) might be the guy to talk to. NSLU2-linux set up a farm of NSLU2s (affectionately called "slugs") for building.
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 7:59 am
by mpthompson » Thu Apr 19, 2012 6:26 pm
repvik said:

You might want to talk to the folks that set up the Debian autobuilder for the NSLU2-linux project. I believe Tom King (ka6sox) might be the guy to talk to. NSLU2-linux set up a farm of NSLU2s (affectionately called "slugs") for building. 

Thanks for the tip.  I have an NSLU2 that I'm running Debian armel on and it was my first foray into Debian and I've been hooked since.  The hostname on my NSLU2 is "slug" as well. :-)

I didn't realize that NSLU2-linux was also a Debian based distribution.  I'll keep it in mind that they created an autobuilder for that project as I wade deeper into the issues.  I can't image what a build-farm of NSLU2's is like.  Is there a term for a group of slugs?
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 620
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:18 pm
Location: San Carlos, CA
by plugwash » Thu Apr 19, 2012 6:29 pm
There were various linux ports for the slug. In particular there was opendebianslug which was a rebuild of debian for the big endian setup used by the default linux install on the slug.

Nowadays though even a maximally fattened slug wouldn't have the memory to build many debian packages in a reasonable time.
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 2235
Joined: Wed Dec 28, 2011 11:45 pm
by mpthompson » Thu Apr 19, 2012 6:54 pm
Update of where I'm at.  Today I need to step back a little and set priorities of the things I need to get done.   There are so many moving parts to this project that I'm starting to lose track of some of them.

I'm currently configuring a dedicated system to be my local master repository -- an HP Media Vault running Debian Squeeze armel.  This will have dual SATA 500GB disks in a RAID1 configuration.  It's not the fastest system and doesn't have gobs of memory, but I've been using these for home backup and I've found them very reliable running under Debian.  If it ultimately proves not to have enough horse power, I'll upgrade to some more powerful Intel hardware, but I would like to avoid the expense of that for now.  With the repository now being about 60GB in size including all sources to be compiled, it's taking me a while to move things around using rsync.

I also now have a dedicated hosted server at DreamHost that will be the public facing side of the Raspberry Pi Debian armhf repository.   I haven't begun to configure that yet, but it shouldn't take more than a day or so.  I've already configured most of the repository on a DreamHost VPS server so hopefully that data will move over without issues and speed up the process of making the repository available.

Next on the list is configuring the four additional iMX53 build servers.  As these are bare boards, I'll need to come up with a way of organizing the hardware so they don't become a tangled knot of SATA, cat5 and power cables.  Getting the local/public repository systems configured and online is my top priority so it will take a few days or more to build up the enclosure for these systems and bring them online.  That will be a good project for my 10-year old son to help me with.

Finally, to be able to get help from others knowledgeable with building entire Debian distributions and the autobuilder process, I want to configure a secure network that these systems mentioned above will live on.  That will be the last step.

At that point, I should be able to turn on the autobuilders and start turning out dozens, if not hundreds, of Raspberry Pi flavored Debian hard float binaries a day.

I'll notify everyone on this forum once the repository is available -- hopefully within the next 48 hours.  Don't expect a whole lot as it's going to be very minimal.  However, if you have a Debian ARM system capable of running ARMv6/ARMv7 floating point code and know how to use debootstrap, it should be useable for testing and running benchmarks.  I'll also make available a Windows based QEMU configuration and a boot image that I use for internal testing of the binaries.  A bootable Raspberry Pi image should be in the mix as well, but that may take a few days longer.

Mike
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 620
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:18 pm
Location: San Carlos, CA
by mpthompson » Fri Apr 20, 2012 3:54 am
For those interested, below is a link to photo of the five build systems and the repository server on my dining room table after assembling them this afternoon.

http://home.comcast.net/~micha.....luster.jpg

This weekend I'll be building a small rack to house them along with a power supply and 16 port switch.  Gotta clean out some space in my basement for them as well.

I know this thread is long and I congratulate those still sticking around to see how a Debian hard float port turns out.  I promise the packages are on the way.

Now, back to configuring the public repository.

Mike
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 620
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:18 pm
Location: San Carlos, CA
by SirLagz » Fri Apr 20, 2012 5:33 am
I like the photo. Very neat.

If I was doing this I'd imagine i'd have stuff hanging off a bookshelf with cables draped everywhere.
My Blog - http://www.sirlagz.net
Visit my blog for Tips, Tricks, Guides and More !
WiFi Issues ? Have a look at this post ! http://www.raspberrypi.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=28&t=44044
Posts: 1704
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2012 8:53 am
Location: Perth, Australia
by mpthompson » Fri Apr 20, 2012 9:35 am
OK, the Raspberry Pi Debian armhf hard float repository (aka Raspbian) is now live at the following URL:

http://debian.raspbian.com/

The GPG key for the repository is here:

http://debian.raspbian.com/ras.....public.key

As of right now I have no documentation on how to use it, but I'll see what I can put together over the next few days.  However, if you know how to use debootstrap and have an ARM device or emulator capability of running ARMv6+VFP code you should be able to use the repository to get a minimal install of hard float Debian running. Also, build-essential and a few other important packages such as gcc-4.7, openssh-client and openssh-server can be installed as well.

The binary packages included so far in the repository can be examined in the Packages file linked below:

http://debian.raspbian.com/deb.....f/Packages

These packages are known to work with the kernel released by the Raspberry Pi foundation.  Of course, this will only currently create an absolute minimal install of Debian, but it should be enough to build and run benchmarks to compare performance against the Debian armel soft float previously released by the Foundation.

What would be really helpful to me is if someone knowledgeable with debootstrap could post instructions for using these packages to install either a chroot or a stand alone install of Debian.  That will give me more time to finish the build cluster so that we can flesh out the repository with the other 95% of the packages that aren't yet built.

Finally, I would like to thank Plugwash for the invaluable advice and encouragement to help get things this far and to John Mills for helping to find sites that will hopefully soon be mirroring the repository.

Off to sleep now.  I'm too old to be staying up to 3am so many nights in a row...
User avatar
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 620
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:18 pm
Location: San Carlos, CA