Heatsinks.


6 posts
by steve_ancell » Sat Nov 03, 2012 4:16 am
I purchased a couple of those minature heatsinks from ebay, is it necesarry for me to use them and will it void the warranty if I do?.

When my replacment RPi arrives I will be putting it inside one of those Adafruit cases, that was the main reason why I got the heatsinks for I was wondering if the temperature would ramp up when it is enclosed.
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by Alfadaz » Sat Nov 03, 2012 6:23 am
I wouldnt have thought it would be necessary for you to fit them. I have the same case and there isn't a major rise in operating temp, maybe a few degrees. I run mine at 800mhz, it will run hotter if overclocked more. Even then i have read on the forums that the Pi doesn't really get near its max operating temp.

I also have a set of heatsinks from ebay, you wont void your warranty if you fit them. I fitted them on mine just in case, plus i think it makes it look a bit nicer than a bare chip :)

Daz
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by milhouse » Sat Nov 03, 2012 7:11 am
Alfadaz wrote:Even then i have read on the forums that the Pi doesn't really get near its max operating temp.


I think it depends on what you're doing.

I've seen one 512MB Pi, in a case, overclocked to 1000/500/600/+4/+2, get up as high as 82.5C while running OpenELEC (scanning media library, etc.) - just 2.5 degrees off the thermal max temp.

However another identically overclocked 512MB Pi, using the same case, but running headless server duties, struggles to hit 60C when running at full chat.

So if you're not overclocked and/or not using the core/h264/gpu components you're unlikely to have temperature issues, but if you are overclocked and using those additional SoC components then yes it is entirely possible to get close to (if not actually hit) the thermal max.

For what it's worth, I'd estimate a 5-6 degree rise in temperature after moving to a case. I bought a box of Enzotech BMR-C1 RAM heatsinks after noticing the increased temperatures, and also realising that the XBMC-running Pi might actually hit 85C without further assistance. So far they seem to be doing the job of preventing any thermal throttling by helping to reverse the 5 degree case-induced temperature increase. I didn't bother installing heatsinks on the headless server as they're not necessary.
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by pluggy » Sat Nov 03, 2012 3:33 pm
The heatsink on the "processor" won't be very efficient in any case since its cooling the RAM chip and the processor is a BGA connection away. I have a headless Pi running in what is effectively a small sealed plastic box - no airflow let alone heaksinks. 2 watts can't produce any serious heat......

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by milhouse » Sat Nov 03, 2012 3:53 pm
pluggy wrote:The heatsink on the "processor" won't be very efficient in any case since its cooling the RAM chip and the processor is a BGA connection away.


Yep, but that heat from the processor is being dumped into the RAM so helping the RAM shift it away can't be a bad thing, overall.

pluggy wrote:I have a headless Pi running in what is effectively a small sealed plastic box - no airflow let alone heaksinks. 2 watts can't produce any serious heat......


Are you using just the ARM with your application, or also in combination with the core/h264/gpu components? I'd guarantee you would see high temps if you are running XBMC on a Pi with "Turbo" settings and viewing high bitrate video or scanning an entire media library.

Ultimately though, a heatsink doesn't help much, but maybe just enough to avoid hitting 85C! :)
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by steve_ancell » Sun Nov 04, 2012 1:17 am
Thanx for the advice guys. ;)
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