Linux command line reference guide

Share and discuss resources for use in the classroom

11 posts
by Markx » Thu Nov 22, 2012 8:30 pm
I'm a noob and I was wondering if there is a Linux command line reference guide?
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2012 12:19 pm
by SN » Thu Nov 22, 2012 9:18 pm
Steve N – binatone mk4->intellivision->zx81->spectrum->cbm64->cpc6128->520stfm->pc->raspi ?
User avatar
Posts: 1008
Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 8:06 pm
Location: Romiley, UK
by sdjf » Tue Dec 04, 2012 5:38 pm
I also have a variety of resources for people new to using command line Linux on the following page:

http://www.sdjf.esmartdesign.com/new.html

Here is a link to Floss Manuals: Introduction to the Command Line

http://www.flossmanuals.net/command-line

But the simplest introductory page I like best is:

http://freeengineer.org/learnUNIXin10minutes.html
FORUM TIP: To view just one person's posting history, sign in, click on their user name, then click on "Search User's Posts." || This Pi owner is running Arch on 512MB Model B.
Posts: 1258
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 5:20 am
Location: California
by Markx » Wed Dec 05, 2012 8:46 am
Thank you. This is very helpful and much appreciated.
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2012 12:19 pm
by jamesh » Wed Dec 05, 2012 9:27 am
Also, you can use the man command on the command line (I know, a bit recursive), to get information on commands

e.g.
man less
man grep
Moderator
Posts: 10515
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 7:41 pm
by sdjf » Wed Dec 05, 2012 4:24 pm
@jamesh: you are right about man pages being a good reference. but as a former noob and someone who still gets baffled by many man pages, I tend to not refer people to them if they are just starting out, most are not very user friendly introductions, but they are excellent reliable encyclopedic lists of syntax and options. For some commands, they are self-explanatory, but for many, I still go glassey-eyed when I try to decipher them.
FORUM TIP: To view just one person's posting history, sign in, click on their user name, then click on "Search User's Posts." || This Pi owner is running Arch on 512MB Model B.
Posts: 1258
Joined: Fri Mar 16, 2012 5:20 am
Location: California
by techpaul » Wed Dec 05, 2012 6:31 pm
Even as semi experienced *nix user I find

Man pages are good when you command or one of the commands in a group of commands (Use the See Also section)

Info pages if installed is good if you have an idea of how it may classified.

Other than that pointers from others, web searches and books are best resources.
Just another techie on the net - For GPIO boards see http:///www.facebook.com/pcservicesreading
or http://www.pcserviceselectronics.co.uk/pi/
Posts: 1481
Joined: Sat Jul 14, 2012 6:40 pm
Location: Reading, UK
by psutton » Wed Jan 30, 2013 12:14 pm
There is a thread on te forum for people new to Linux, either that you should see if there is a LInux user group (or similar) near you, and join that, as that may also be a good way to find local pi users to you, and local linux users who can help.
Posts: 110
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2012 10:45 pm
Location: Devon
by duberry » Wed Jan 30, 2013 3:35 pm
also the http://tldp.org

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux_Documentation_Project

http://tldp.org/guides.html

scanning tldp i managed to find , this
http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/text/Bash-Prompt-HOWTO
surprising this is new to me as scanning through i discovered its been around a while
the first
submitted version was January 1998
! ,.. anyway

tho the bash how to text is not short , its easy enough to
download a copy to your desktop for future reference
with wget
search for strings with grep , showing the line numbers that contain something of interest
then use sed to
display a range of text , using the line numbers found by grep ing (with '-n' option )

eg..
Code: Select all
# change to desktop , using the cd command
cd ~/Desktop

# make local copy of the bash how to text file , using wget
wget http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/text/Bash-Prompt-HOWTO

# search the file for the "text"  in quotes , using grep
grep -n "been maintaining this document" ./Bash-Prompt-HOWTO

# display only lines 137 and 138 from file , using sed
sed -n '137,138p' ./Bash-Prompt-HOWTO

running the above commands
should display
something abit like

cd ~/Desktop

wget http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/text/Bash-Prompt-HOWTO
--2013-01-30 14:53:40-- http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/text/Bash-Prompt-HOWTO
Resolving http://www.tldp.org (http://www.tldp.org)... 152.19.134.41
Connecting to http://www.tldp.org (http://www.tldp.org)|152.19.134.41|:80... connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 200 OK
Length: 198225 (194K) [text/plain]
Saving to: `Bash-Prompt-HOWTO'

100%[=====================================>] 198,225 161K/s in 1.2s

2013-01-30 14:53:42 (161 KB/s) - `Bash-Prompt-HOWTO' saved [198225/198225]

grep -n "been maintaining this document" ./Bash-Prompt-HOWTO
137:I've been maintaining this document for nearly six years (I believe the first

sed -n '137,138p' ./Bash-Prompt-HOWTO
I've been maintaining this document for nearly six years (I believe the first
submitted version was January 1998). I've received a lot of e-mail, almost

lend me your arms, fast as thunderbolts, for a pillow on my journey.
If the environment was a bank, would it be too big to fail
so long; and thanks for all the pi
User avatar
Posts: 378
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2013 10:44 pm
Location: standing on a planet that's evolving. And revolving at nine hundred miles an hour
by g3sna » Sun Mar 03, 2013 8:30 pm
The file at the following link might be useful if you have used DOS commands in the past.

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/80214116/DOS-Li ... mmands.doc
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 8:04 pm
by duberry » Mon Mar 04, 2013 1:37 am
g3sna wrote:The file at the following link might be useful if you have used DOS commands in the past.

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/80214116/DOS-Li ... mmands.doc


not in a good format tho :|
how did u find it btw ??
lend me your arms, fast as thunderbolts, for a pillow on my journey.
If the environment was a bank, would it be too big to fail
so long; and thanks for all the pi
User avatar
Posts: 378
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2013 10:44 pm
Location: standing on a planet that's evolving. And revolving at nine hundred miles an hour