Mount Pi in Plug - Possible?


8 posts
by FunkyMrMagic » Tue Jul 03, 2012 11:14 am
I'm in no way savvy on the electronics side of things, but I was thinking on this the other day whilst I've been waiting for my Pi to arrive, and I was wondering if there's any real reason why a case couldn't be made to directly connect to, and supply power from, a regular power socket in the style of a GuruPlug Server for example?

Can anybody give me a high-level overview of what I'd need to do to achieve this? Presumably some kind of transformer/voltage regulator to supply the 5.5v that the Pi needs?
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by Hartspoon » Thu Jul 05, 2012 1:38 am
It's 5V, not 5.5V. Do not forget that, or you'll have to wait again, but for a new Raspberry Pi!

I think it could be pretty easy to do, since you just need a micro USB power supply, like a smartphone charger. You shouldn't have too much trouble finding one.

The Raspberry Pi is precisely designed to use them so it's perfectly safe, but remember, It needs to output exactly 5.0V and at least 0.7A. More than 0.7A is okay since the R-Pi just takes what it needs, but do not mess with the voltage. It has to be 5V and nothing else. You do not want to kill your Raspberry Pi.

For example, I have a Samsung Marvel S5560 charger, with a regular power socket, outputting exactly 5V 0.7A. It does not heat and is pretty small, and I'm sure it could be integrated in a case.

So find one, open it, and you'll have the perfect transformer. You could then try to put it inside your case, properly fixed and isolated, of course. Try to find one with a short cable. If you can't or if it's still too long to fit in the case, you'll have to shorten it. It's easier to weld the two thin wires of the cable on the transformer than on the USB plug. If you haven't any experience in welding, practice first. Also, welding thin wires is way easier with someone to help you holding them.
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by Dilligaf » Thu Jul 05, 2012 2:07 am
um, not being picky but I think you mean solder and not weld. I suspect English isn't your primary language.
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by Hartspoon » Thu Jul 05, 2012 11:15 am
It isn't. Thank you for the precision, I had indeed a doubt ^^

In French, both are called "soudure" so I didn't know which one to use. I understand the difference between solderind and welding now, thank you.
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by markb » Thu Jul 05, 2012 11:59 am
If you aren't sure whether to weld or solder, you could always try brazing.
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by cslowik » Thu Jul 05, 2012 8:48 pm
lol brazing tiny sensitive electrical components
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by Hartspoon » Fri Jul 06, 2012 2:02 am
Well, if everyone goes brazing, I'll stick to my first idea and keep the word "welding". Come on, arc welding something on a Raspberry Pi couldn't be that wrong.
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by Dilligaf » Fri Jul 06, 2012 3:32 am
Hartspoon wrote:Well, if everyone goes brazing, I'll stick to my first idea and keep the word "welding". Come on, arc welding something on a Raspberry Pi couldn't be that wrong.


Give it a go, and post a video on Youtube. I'm sure it'll go viral :D
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