Book/documentary on the history and story of the Pi


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by felix123 » Mon May 21, 2012 12:04 pm
I have a vision of a book/documentary on the history of the Pi, the development of the board/choosing of the components (seems to be quite a story there, based on the blog posts), its impact on IT education and beyond (would have to wait a year or more for this though). Would someone be interested to do this? :D
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by cheery » Mon May 21, 2012 1:00 pm
About any news outlet there is? Most of the history of pi is in future still.
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by jack3d » Mon May 21, 2012 2:23 pm
If you look on the wiki page and scroll to references you can work out a sort of list including dates based on press releases/sale dates etc... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raspberry_Pi
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by Burngate » Mon May 21, 2012 5:16 pm
Couple of nudges I gave to Liz:
viewtopic.php?f=62&t=887&p=9963&hilit=soul#p9963
viewtopic.php?f=63&t=968&p=19081&hilit=soul#p19081
Don't know if anything has been thought about along those lines.
But the whole saga seems to me to be an important topic, historically speaking. Whoever does "The Official Raspberry Pi" should be allowed access to Liz's diary - leaving out the cats 'n cookery
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by felix123 » Tue May 22, 2012 12:52 am
Cool someone else is thinking about the same lines, I'll request "The Soul of a New Machine" from the library
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by benzeman » Tue May 22, 2012 6:41 am
felix123 wrote:I have a vision of a book/documentary on the history of the Pi, the development of the board/choosing of the components (seems to be quite a story there, based on the blog posts), its impact on IT education and beyond (would have to wait a year or more for this though). Would someone be interested to do this? :D


I want to add this into the "unofficial" raspberry pi manual (link) - at the moment I'm thinking of having a 2 page spread. If you'd be willing to write a brief history and then release it under CC-BY-SA, then I'd be very grateful, and more than willing to include it!
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by AndyRose » Tue Aug 28, 2012 3:58 pm
I'm preparing my final year dissertation on the Raspberry Pi, where I have several pages written about the history of the Pi. If that would help anyone?
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by SimonSmall » Tue Oct 09, 2012 9:03 pm
Sorry for reviving this old thread, but it seemed silly to start a new one.

I thought it would be nice to have a history of the RPi so that new owners / users could understand why the RPi exists, and why they have got what they have. I have created a page on the wiki; see http://elinux.org/RPiGeneralHistory.

To be useful, it has to be brief so it can be read quickly; I did not want to create a book. I did not think that announcements about the future should be in a history page. I did not think it needed to cover everything; Wikipedia can do that.

I felt that users should know why it was created, perhaps that will help promote the goals of the RPi foundation? I felt it was also important to include the reasoning for why it has the capabilities it has (or has not!).

So, what should I include? That is a hard choice. I decided to include events that will seem significant in a years time, with a two line summary and a link to the full story. Most of what I included are references to this site.

I don't know what others will think are significant events, or what will seem significant in a years time, but I felt it had to exist under the control of the RPi community.
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by stevepdp » Thu Nov 15, 2012 7:39 pm
I privately collect a lot of Raspberry Pi related audio and video media which I hope to formally archive somewhere when the time is appropriate. I also find myself picking up a lot of the official or "blessed" third party hardware that makes it to market such as the addon boards, any Pibow variants, physical books and magazines.

I think those of us interested in documenting the development of the Raspberry Pi and it's community are in a lucky position as we're living it all right now - so there's little chance of loosing any history. We don't need to work backwards in a ways similar to say what Jason Scott has done with his archiving projects.

I would actually recommend watching some of his talks and documentaries to get a feel for what professional digital archivists do. I fairly recently picked up both of his DVDs from here but you can also watch most of his works for free without the extra content at archive.org.
I'm not a part of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, I'm just an enthusiastic fan.
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