C IDE/text editor for Wheezy


19 posts
by LandyManLuke » Fri Jun 29, 2012 12:10 pm
Hi all,

I am currently using Nano for command line editing, and Leafpad in X. I'd prefer using something like gedit in X, but I am struggling to install it using apt-get.

What are others using? Any reccommendations?

Regards,

Luke
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by panik » Fri Jun 29, 2012 12:57 pm
I'm using geany in X. I believe it's pre-installed on the Squeeze image, but not on Wheezy. Try sudo apt-get install geany.

Geany has a 'build and run' button, just like its big brother-IDE's, but it looks for Makefiles. Very easy to set up. It also has a built-in terminal tab that's very handy. It does a little bit of code-completion as well. At least it recognizes the names of functions, variables and constants you have been using.

And yes, trying to install gedit is giving me 'unmet dependencies' as well. It's not just you.
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by garethlewis » Fri Jun 29, 2012 4:41 pm
I'm using VS2010, samba and putty.

That's probably the wrong answer, but it works for me ;)
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by Simon H » Fri Jun 29, 2012 8:21 pm
Geany was the best choice for a simple IDE but all the colours in the editor are messed up in Wheezy/Geany see this thread.

viewtopic.php?f=66&t=8798&p=108001&hilit=geany+wheezy#p108001

I have tried changing them in the config files but they don't come out as the colours you set them to as there are so many combinations it is hard to guess what it will look like.
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by gordon@drogon.net » Fri Jun 29, 2012 9:28 pm
There's always vi (or vim) ...

-Gordon
--
Gordons projects: https://projects.drogon.net/
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by panik » Fri Jun 29, 2012 11:26 pm
Ah, I wasn't aware of the color problem with Geany in Wheezy. That is, I saw it when I tried but didn't give it much thought assuming that would be easily changed. Thanks Simon.

I'm actually mostly using Geany in X using my main Ubuntu pc. Much like garethlewis is doing on his Windows pc, but with sftp in Nautilus and ssh in the terminal. That makes the most sense for me. After all, my main pc is where the ashtray and coffeemug are. And comfy chair. It also has the added bonus of the responsiveness of your main pc, even with a gazillion browser tabs open.

Edit: Gordon probably has the best answer. Bite the bullet and learn vi properly. I know I should do that, but keep putting it off.
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by Nr90 » Fri Jun 29, 2012 11:38 pm
Gvim, gives you the GUI in X and works excellent in CLI as well.
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by Simon H » Sat Jun 30, 2012 12:24 pm
I too will be using Visual Studio via SMB as windows is my primary development enviroment but I like using geany for quick changes when my main PC is off or working remotely. I prefer Nano to vi as a command line editor which is just what the standard text editor that I am used to.
Command line editors are fine but if you have multiple files/classes in your project a multiple file gui is the most productive way to go in my opinion, I don't want to reignite the gui verses command line debate as that has been covered in another thread.
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by jacksonliam » Sat Jun 30, 2012 7:45 pm
I seemed to prefer an SFTP connection (if ssh is installed you can use filezilla to sftp in) to edit the files using notepad++ on my windows machine. Clicking save in notepad++ saved the file to the R-Pi.
Then compiling with the command line over ssh.

I tried using codeblocks but gave up when my code seemed to get to the raspi sometimes, sometimes compiled and most of the time an old version.

Also edited a few bits of code quickly on my galaxy note using connectbot and hackers-keyboard to access nano. For when I didn't have a PC on and inspiration struck :D
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by leon_heller » Sat Jun 30, 2012 8:05 pm
gordon@drogon.net wrote:There's always vi (or vim) ...

-Gordon


I just used Vim to create a simple Hello World program, so that I can check out gcc. It got itself into a funny mode that didn't allow me to do anything to the text, but it eventually sorted itself out.
Leon Heller
G1HSM
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by pjc123 » Sat Jun 30, 2012 10:44 pm
It is worth learning vi because you can use it through either the command line or GUI (through a terminal) and it is available on every flavor of UNIX and Linux on the planet. Real UNIX/Linux system administrators will tell you that they spend 99% of their time on the command line. I have a feeling that Gordon, like myself have been doing system administration, C programming or something related for too many years to admit. Granted, GUI's are nice for doing complicated moves and transfers, but what happens when you have an emergency mission critical quick fix to make half way across the world and only the command line is available.......and you are out of practice? Then again, I do not see a raspberry pi being used to operate a nuclear reactor; I just figure that the pi might be a stepping stone for someone who will make a career out of Linux.
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by oztrailrider » Tue Jul 03, 2012 4:42 am
I quite like the jed text editor. I find it works well, has great syntax highlighting and auto-indenting for C. It also does not take a month of learning keyboard shortcuts to be useful. It somewhat reminds me of the old DOS edit.
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by Nr90 » Tue Jul 03, 2012 12:13 pm
Simon H wrote:I too will be using Visual Studio via SMB as windows is my primary development enviroment but I like using geany for quick changes when my main PC is off or working remotely. I prefer Nano to vi as a command line editor which is just what the standard text editor that I am used to.
Command line editors are fine but if you have multiple files/classes in your project a multiple file gui is the most productive way to go in my opinion, I don't want to reignite the gui verses command line debate as that has been covered in another thread.


Vim does split window multiple file editing :mrgreen:
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by Bellagio » Tue Jul 03, 2012 2:51 pm
I'm using emacs-nox, but use an external editor on windows and then upload files, it's weird...
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by san » Tue Jul 03, 2012 6:51 pm
I'm getting quite fond of codelite. Has similar bindings as visual studio and is feature wise comparable to code::blocks. You might give that a try.
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by pjc123 » Sat Jul 28, 2012 12:14 pm
san wrote:I'm getting quite fond of codelite. Has similar bindings as visual studio and is feature wise comparable to code::blocks. You might give that a try.


From what I can tell the codelite binary is not available for Wheezy, just Squeeze; Did you compile it yourself? However it looks like code::blocks is available for Wheezy, so I probably will give that a try.
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by pjc123 » Sat Jul 28, 2012 3:04 pm
code::block was available for Wheezy and installed without any problems. Way overkill, but it has everything I need.
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by f25 » Wed Apr 17, 2013 6:14 pm
Hehe... shall you need a randomized array please put user in front of VI and ask him to quit.
There should be something else! Standard "arrow", home, end etc keys support, plus some "classic Ctrl+something is not a rocket science!
Cheers!
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by scrapheap » Thu Apr 18, 2013 10:25 am
If you are willing to put the effort in to learning vim or emacs then the rewards can be great. Personally I use vim a lot (for C coding, Scripting, web development, mobile app development, etc) and while there have been times that I have had to learn something new about it to save my time and sanity, I haven't found anything that you can't do in it (though I recommend against making your command mode read only).

I know other people that use emacs, which is just a capable as vim, but different. Give them both a try and see if you get on with them. A word of caution though, the learning curve is quite steep to start with, but reading a few tutorials should get you on your way.
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